Why I’m less lonelier of a programmer than I used to be

Programming

I am still not a loner. I still have friends, trust me.

So what do I mean by less lonelier of a programmer than I used to be then?

Since I started programming in 2008, I have explored many types of programming, but what has always resonated with me is web programming. In fact, that’s why my business tends to concentrate on the web. My business MyWikis uses MediaWiki to host wikis, so naturally, since MediaWiki is written in PHP, I have become quite fluent in the language. Although it’s been derided for its confusing array of language constructs and inconsistent functions, it’s still vitally important to web programming.

Why am I so interested in web programming, then, if its main languages are beginnerish and inconsistent? Because I know that desktop applications are lame, inaccessible, and unless it’s really good, there’s not much of a point in using them. I started web programming before HTML5, before Chromebooks, before the present era of the easy, modern web. Most people are interested not about downloading a web application and then using it, but simply typing in an address and getting all the information on a website. And if this website can do really cool things, all without leaving the comfort of one’s web browser, then that’s awesome!

This school year was the first time that I left for TAMS and would no longer see my dear friends every day at school. To be honest, it tears me up every time I think of it too much. It pains me, because I miss them. Yet this ironically brought us closer.

My rhetorical skills are usually pretty crappy. I always tried to convince them of the benefits of web programming, but for some reason, they never caught on until recently. When I left. Hmm. Kind of makes me feel like I was an antidote to the crusade of web programming conversion.

This awesome group of friends that I’ve had for many years now share the same passion for web programming that I do. While I slaved away at building MyWikis using PHP, JavaScript, HTML, shell, etc., my friends developed their interests in JavaScript, Node.js, Python, Yesod, PostgreSQL, and other web development platforms/languages.

Unfortunately, I’m an old dog, new tricks kind of web programmer, because the industry moves so quickly it’s unimaginable and hard for me to keep up with. The issue with old dog, new tricks kind of people is that they tend to stick with their old-style roots, which doesn’t help in an environment where new is (almost) always better. Now, the new thing is Node.js and since MediaWiki requires this in Parsoid, I am forced to bend down and get familiar with Node.js. And don’t forget Python and Ruby, which have somehow become backbones of the web. (I’m clearly in denial! :P)

Those who used to be my exceptions now champion the causes of their web programmer crusades of conversion. Both friends are interested in web development and that excites me! One friend knows Node.js (he’s truly a genius) and helped create Elephant (https://github.com/jeffw16/elephant), which won the Fall 2016 TAMS Hackathon. When I worked with him, my mind was quite dead but his was alive at 4am. It was an honor to create a project and I still remember it fondly. (Side note: PHP is still more accessible to others with a tight budget and resources (cough cough that’s me cough cough) and that is why I continue to use it.) Another friend develops in Python and interned at Mozilla the summer before his freshman year of college. He now develops for OU Web Communications and omg he’s just out of this world amazing ok moving on

But I still feel lonely, even after a whole year. As you may have noticed, this post is structured very similarly to a post made in December 2015. Since then, things have changed quite a bit.

I might just have a really closed mind, or I might actually be a loner, but it’s mainly because web programming is so diverse and nobody comes near the web development associated with MediaWiki, WordPress, and other software like that. Node.js isn’t used for stuff like that, and Python is probably better suited for newer, larger, and more complex applications. The nearest cousins of MediaWiki in Python would be MoinMoin and I’m not getting into that! (I don’t think there is a MediaWiki in Node.js yet.)

Why am I so concerned with people knowing PHP or even remotely having some kind of passion for MediaWiki?

It’s hard to run a company alone, but I manage to do so because there isn’t anybody interested in what I do, even though it makes money! A company is supposed to be a team effort, and honestly would be much more fun and efficient if that was done. However, nobody has that passion, and being a teenager who has done this for half his life (yikes!) doesn’t help with finding people actually interested in developing with or maintaining a company about MediaWiki. Furthermore, the market is quite divided, with most people not even needing the services of MyWikis or they use a completely different wiki engine that isn’t remotely compatible, like TWiki or MoinMoin.

And that’s why I’m still a lonely programmer, just less lonely than before, and I grin. I’d love to be even less lonelier.

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